Management InSites

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  • Best Practices for Tax Preparation

    Accurate tax reporting is a key component to the health and well-being of any company. While the accountants and bookkeepers in your company may not actually process your company tax returns, they still have an essential job in the tax preparation process.

    October 5, 2020
  • Order Entry – It’s All in the Details

    When processing a high volume of customer orders, it is not uncommon to go on autopilot. But autopilot is the exact opposite of what is needed when it comes to delivering a high-quality service to your client.

    September 23, 2020
  • Are You Using American Measurements in Your Literature?

    As you work to set up your U.S. subsidiary, don’t forget to take a look at your marketing materials and ensure they will engage your potential customers. It can be easy to forget how essential appropriate brochures and other collateral can be for your U.S. market entry success.

    September 14, 2020
  • Basic Best Practices for Accounting and Bookkeeping

    When it comes to accounting and bookkeeping, there isn’t much room for error. Keeping sloppy books is not only bad business, but it can also be expensive in the event of an audit. There are some missteps, though, of which even a good bookkeeper can be guilty.

    September 10, 2020
How can we help you?
Contact us or submit a business inquiry online.

International Business Travel in the Time of COVID

International companies have had to pivot over and over again while dealing with the consequences of the pandemic. Everything from travel restrictions to spiking numbers of COVID cases has made doing business across borders practically impossible.

While the pandemic is far from over, the world has had to learn to proceed with business in this new state of normal. That has meant increasing precautions, sanitizing more, social distancing, working remotely, and managing new restrictions put in place by authorities.

At the time of print, most travelers cannot directly enter the United States from several countries around the world. They must first come through approved countries, spend at least 14 days there, and then enter the States. Mexico and Canada are among the countries that are not currently restricted – so several corporations abroad can take advantage of that fact by having their employees who must travel to the U.S. spend two weeks in one of our neighboring countries prior to entering (the rules and regulations on what has to be done in those countries may vary depending on the traveler’s nationality or country of departure).

Countries that are currently banned for travel into the U.S. include:

  • China
  • Iran
  • European Schengen Area
  • United Kingdom
  • Republic of Ireland
  • Brazil

For a more complete list, go here. For some of these countries, there is also the National Interest Exception (NIE), which would allow direct entry for those who apply and are granted this special entry exception. Please note that the system is backlogged, so plan accordingly. It could take 30-60 days for approval, and then travel must happen in the next 30 days. It is also a one-time entry deal, so any subsequent entries to the U.S. while restrictions are in place would require a new NIE. More on that here.

For travelers who are conducting business in other non-restricted countries, they can come directly to the U.S., assuming they spent the previous 14 days in that country. To avoid any potential issues, book a direct flight.

Once in the U.S., CDC guidelines vary according to state. It is best to follow any updates on its website to be safe. For example, certain states are banning travelers from other states if the state is considered a “hot spot”. And some states, like NC, are requiring masks to be worn in public if you can’t social distance (in stores, crowded areas, etc.). Furthermore, each company you may want to visit will have their own ideas as to who can come in and who cannot and what may be required of any visitor.

While this time is confusing, inconvenient, and to a certain extent dangerous, it does not mean that all business must stop. It is just a matter of being informed, prepared, and flexible.

Read more
  • Best Practices for Tax Preparation

    Accurate tax reporting is a key component to the health and well-being of any company. While the accountants and bookkeepers in your company may not actually process your company tax returns, they still have an essential job in the tax preparation process.

    October 5, 2020
  • Order Entry – It’s All in the Details

    When processing a high volume of customer orders, it is not uncommon to go on autopilot. But autopilot is the exact opposite of what is needed when it comes to delivering a high-quality service to your client.

    September 23, 2020
  • Are You Using American Measurements in Your Literature?

    As you work to set up your U.S. subsidiary, don’t forget to take a look at your marketing materials and ensure they will engage your potential customers. It can be easy to forget how essential appropriate brochures and other collateral can be for your U.S. market entry success.

    September 14, 2020
  • Basic Best Practices for Accounting and Bookkeeping

    When it comes to accounting and bookkeeping, there isn’t much room for error. Keeping sloppy books is not only bad business, but it can also be expensive in the event of an audit. There are some missteps, though, of which even a good bookkeeper can be guilty.

    September 10, 2020
How can we help you?
Contact us or submit a business inquiry online.

International Business Travel in the Time of COVID

In our previous post on the topic, we covered some important things to remember when setting up your company in the U.S. market. Beyond operations, sales, and marketing, a manager would be remiss not to focus on how cultural differences might impact the success of a subsidiary.

The U.S. is not homogenous

Unlike several other countries, the U.S. is vast – and not just in its size. Americans tend to break up the country into its East and West coasts, and the Midwest. But there are even more segments, like the South, Pacific Northwest, the Northeast, Florida, and Texas – all of which differ greatly from each other. There are several big cities, countless medium-sized markets, and even more rural or suburban areas. Interacting with people living in big cities will differ greatly from interacting with people in smaller towns. While it would be unwise to generalize, it is best to understand the culture of the part of the U.S. in which you are doing business before having expectations.

Patience is not always a strength among Americans

When in negotiations or conducting business, Americans tend to want to just get the deal done. While many other cultures take their time, get to know everyone involved, and move along at a comfortable pace, those in the U.S. do not always see a need to drag things out. Get ready for what looks like impatience, when in reality it is just a desire to be efficient and effective.

Don’t plan on in-person meetings 

At least not all the time. The tendency for Europeans and Asians to conduct most business in person is not the same in the U.S. Phone calls, emails, and now even video conference calls are the norm. Businesspeople like to work efficiently, and don’t gather in person unless it is necessary. First meetings, larger negotiations, and important topics are generally discussed in-person. Otherwise, don’t be offended or surprised if many of your interactions are taking place remotely.

Open-minded over traditions

A positive aspect of Americans in general is their ability to have an open mind. Many other cultures rely heavily on traditions, and act in certain ways because history dictates that they should. That is not the case in the U.S. Americans tend to welcome new ideas and concepts perhaps more freely than their foreign counterparts.

That being said, Europeans tend to rely on strongly forged bonds in which trust is paramount. Loyalty is key. Americans tend to be looser and more pragmatic when it comes to doing business. They don’t necessarily need to have known someone for years to begin working with them. At the end of the day, it’s about getting the deal done.