Management InSites

The Right Content for Your Content Strategy

In a previous post, we discussed the importance of posting content on social media (including LinkedIn) that links back to your company’s website. Since we, as content creators, do not “own” the followers we have on social media, it is imperative that we direct them to our sites to read our content so that they can also learn more about our company and potentially sign up for any newsletters, etc.

In this post, we explore the type of content to consider posting across platforms for a strong content strategy. Content can come in many forms – written posts, podcasts, infographics, animation videos, or a combination thereof. It can be new ideas, top 5 lists, interviews with successful companies or managers, articles, and more. The content should span your company’s expertise as managers, problem solvers, customer specialists, salespeople, etc. 

Here are some ideas for content:

  • Articles on advancements and news within your target industry.  
  • Helpful advice and tips from experts in the field. 
  • Interesting statistics, uses, stories, etc. about your products. 
  • Statistics, stories, etc. about the industry at large.  
  • Photos and posts of new products and innovations. 
  • Videos on how your product/technology/company works.
  • Case studies of your solutions in action.
  • Human interest pieces on company personnel.

While all the content you create will be housed on your website, on LinkedIn (as with all social media), it is vital to share just as much content you do not create. Exclusively sharing your content can seem too pushy or too focused on sales. Rather, you want to convey that you want the audience to succeed and provide them with information they would view as helpful and beneficial. Therefore, all LinkedIn posts should be informative and should adhere to the right mix between content (70%) and selling (30%). Follow the model: “First, you inform; second, you entertain; third, you interact; and last, you sell,” per the article “The Power of Word of Mouth: Adding Social Media to the Marketing Mix” by Guillermo Armelini and Julian Villanueva. 

Additionally, with LinkedIn, you want to use your company page to highlight your company culture. Therefore, posts should also include write-ups with pictures and videos of your staff at work and play. You could post photos from any internal celebrations you do, when you have customers or potential customers in town (if appropriate and not confidential), when you are participating in outside webinars, behind the scenes pictures of what goes into making a product for one of your customers, etc. These types of posts serve a dual purpose: they humanize your company and brand while also serving as recruiting tools if you choose to expand your team. 

A good rule of thumb to live by – would you want to read the content you are producing? If not, why would anyone else?

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How can we help you?
Contact us or submit a business inquiry online.
Read more
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    When it comes time to ship inventory to the United States, many foreign companies are unaware of the standards surrounding palletizing their shipments. While it is possible to ship a container oversees without pallets, it might not be the most cost-effective solution, especially when using an established warehouse or 3PL.

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  • The Changing World of 3PLs

    Third-party warehouses (3PLs) have historically provided companies with an invaluable service: the ability to store inventory and ship it out to customers around the globe. These warehouses are experts at packaging products to maximize order fulfillment.

    July 1, 2021
  • International Shipping and Incoterms

    When dealing with shipping internationally, especially from abroad to the U.S., setting the terms of the transaction from the moment the customer requests a quote is incredibly important. To avoid problems, unwanted costs, and even potential legal issues, there should be no room for confusion or ambiguity in the contract you set up with your customer.

    March 8, 2021
How can we help you?
Contact us or submit a business inquiry online.

The Right Content for Your Content Strategy

In our previous post on the topic, we covered some important things to remember when setting up your company in the U.S. market. Beyond operations, sales, and marketing, a manager would be remiss not to focus on how cultural differences might impact the success of a subsidiary.

The U.S. is not homogenous

Unlike several other countries, the U.S. is vast – and not just in its size. Americans tend to break up the country into its East and West coasts, and the Midwest. But there are even more segments, like the South, Pacific Northwest, the Northeast, Florida, and Texas – all of which differ greatly from each other. There are several big cities, countless medium-sized markets, and even more rural or suburban areas. Interacting with people living in big cities will differ greatly from interacting with people in smaller towns. While it would be unwise to generalize, it is best to understand the culture of the part of the U.S. in which you are doing business before having expectations.

Patience is not always a strength among Americans

When in negotiations or conducting business, Americans tend to want to just get the deal done. While many other cultures take their time, get to know everyone involved, and move along at a comfortable pace, those in the U.S. do not always see a need to drag things out. Get ready for what looks like impatience, when in reality it is just a desire to be efficient and effective.

Don’t plan on in-person meetings 

At least not all the time. The tendency for Europeans and Asians to conduct most business in person is not the same in the U.S. Phone calls, emails, and now even video conference calls are the norm. Businesspeople like to work efficiently, and don’t gather in person unless it is necessary. First meetings, larger negotiations, and important topics are generally discussed in-person. Otherwise, don’t be offended or surprised if many of your interactions are taking place remotely.

Open-minded over traditions

A positive aspect of Americans in general is their ability to have an open mind. Many other cultures rely heavily on traditions, and act in certain ways because history dictates that they should. That is not the case in the U.S. Americans tend to welcome new ideas and concepts perhaps more freely than their foreign counterparts.

That being said, Europeans tend to rely on strongly forged bonds in which trust is paramount. Loyalty is key. Americans tend to be looser and more pragmatic when it comes to doing business. They don’t necessarily need to have known someone for years to begin working with them. At the end of the day, it’s about getting the deal done.